CNC mill built from a 3D Printer!

CNC mill built from a 3D Printer!



Want a CNC mill, but only have a 3D printer? Well, if it's sufficiently overbuilt you can convert it for less than $100!

πŸ›’ ER11 Spindles (and sets)
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πŸ›’ 48V power supplies
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πŸ›’ End mills
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πŸ’» ESTLcam http://estlcam.de/


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25 Responses to "CNC mill built from a 3D Printer!"

  1. That is great Tom! What type of firmware are you using for your CNC, is it marlin with estlcam as the "slicer"?

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  2. I see an ar15 part maker.

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  3. Nice job, and thanks for the links, also!

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  4. I think someone should make a 3d printer with a hot swappable function

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  5. The Issue you will have and will ALWAYS have is the use of those flexible motor couplings like the ones you've used on the Z AXIS and the use of 2 motors on the Z Axis. The Z axis will never be able to produce any kind of accuracy or have any rigidity with those flexible couplings.

    I learned this when I built my CNC machine. Instead, I used 8mm threaded rod, drilled the centre of the end of the rod with a tight 5mm hole and then using a saw, cut down the length of the rod about 2cm making a slot along the hole you've made. That can then slide over the 5mm shaft of the motor and with 2 M8 nuts tightened against each other where the slot is compresses the slot and the rod against the motor shaft.
    There you have a simple but very effective way of stiffening a simple axis drive.

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  6. Konstantinos Avgenakhs9 March 2017 at 07:27

    man you maybe know something ,but all the idea you have is so black.... 0 at the end you will lost more money tring that then the item you will make....+all the progress you did was fail , (because you will lost many parts from the rpm and you will never get a better work on metal or wood for more than a year ,because it will always bent ,)good luck
    you can try to be mechanical but with out engneering you can fix or upgrate nathing (N,Q,M 1 problem ,math 2on problem ,......)
    +cnc parts and trilling parts have diagram about speed ,kg ,year.... that i think you dont even check

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  7. thanks, that was fun

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  8. I dont think ESTLcam has an english version. :(

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  9. UncaringZebra7 SevenSquad9 March 2017 at 07:27

    i clicked on this because i saw the overwatch emblem on the thumbnail. XD oh well, Im still fascinated by 3d printing! really cool!

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  10. SpacierDiamond7 SevenSquad9 March 2017 at 07:27

    OVERWATCH SYMBOL!!!!!!

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  11. I left a like on this one, because i learned that is better make a new one :)

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  12. @Thomas

    Do you have a solution for the speed control? (Be careful with just adjusting the voltage by the trim pot, the electronics inside or not satisfied with this. The function from this trim pot is to adjust the voltage back to 48V when the load is high.)

    Maybe you can also look into mostly printed CNC, this one I'm currently making :D

    I looking forward to you next video's about CNC.

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  13. Richard Towers9 March 2017 at 07:27

    I was toying with the idea of putting together a self build 3D printer and converting it so it could to light CNC milling as well. I even identified the newer Proxxon hobby tool as a possible spindle.Comparisons all seem to rate it as far more durable than the Dremel.
    In the end though I guessed that the build would always be too compromised by starting with a printer. It seems like you're going to spend quite a bit in combined time and outlay to beef the printer up in order to get a very lightweight mill that may still shorten the axis motors' lives significantly. You're already starting to look like Theseus.

    I think the only satisfactory way to go, at least if you only want 1 machine in the room, is to save up for one of those Chinese $1,500-$2,000 5 axis CNCs and build a print head and heated bed to fit it.
    That outlay typically gives you:
    - 1 to 2kw water cooled spindle;
    - 5 axis CNC milling (with the software by the looks. Pirate?) and wide range of compatible end mills available;
    - a tank with some of them, if you need to cut while using coolant;
    - a CNC router that takes a useful range of bits;
    - an engraver;
    - possibly even a 3D part scanner by attaching a measuring tool;
    - and finally a 3D printer as well.

    Repeatable placement of tool placement is typically quoted as <20 microns.
    It seems so obvious that you should be able to have all in one machine, but I think the CNC spec' defines the build and then it won't even notice when it's carrying a printer on its shoulders or routing soft materials.

    The only thing I profoundly lack is any kind of justification that has a hope in hell of passing the wife test :'-(

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  14. BlenderTutGerman9 March 2017 at 07:27

    The Proxxon tool (and aequivalents) actually have one. single. small. bearing. xD

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  15. One quick comment. Ballscrews! @ these dimensions ~$15/pcs from aliexpress. speed, smoothness, what's not to want?

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  16. Very cool!! Now print a vacuum shroud. lol

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  17. I realize that I'm a month behind, and you may have already settled on a solution to the belt question, but maybe going from 2GT to 3GT belts might take care of your issues in that area? By all accounts there is a marked strength improvement from 2nd gen to 3rd and since they share tooth profiles it'd be maybe $35 for the whole thing.

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  18. the music ruin the video.............................................

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  19. Hi Thomas, really enjoyed your video after finding you recently. Have you pondered converting medium-duty CNC mill to 3D print? I picked up one for about $700 USD that had a fairly ample working envelope of roughly 300x400mm, though currently the Z axis only has 80mm of travel. I paid a little extra for a fourth axis which shipped with a full-size 3-jaw chuck you might see mounted on a mini-lathe, very impressive. It's very sturdy with 12mm aluminum plate used throughout the entire machine, and ballscrews for low backlash. It's not for working steel but very competent and quite accurate for everything else (Uses 16X microstepping for .000625mm/step). Uses a 24V supply with what they call "57" stepper motors, very quiet and works great with an Arduino Uno running GRBL (Though GRBL doesn't support the fourth axis); it shipped with a 25-pin printer-port-style connector but since I didn't want to run the steppers from my PC I used GRBL to do the G-code work onboard. I use a free package called bCNC to drive it from my Linux/Ubuntu PC, which includes quite a few features for simple things like leveling a surface, engraving text and shapes etc., and provides profiles for materials and end mills/tooling, along with buffering and loading G-code files, interpreting DXF, and even ASCII STL. It even has support for using a USB camera to do measurements and homing, though I haven't gotten mine properly calibrated and mounted yet; I thought it was a very ambitious feature for such a simple, powerful package.
    Anyway, the mill was an attractive buy since it shipped completely assembled in two large, heavy wooden crates from a company in California (I'm in the US), and arrived in perfect condition due to some serious, steel tie-downs and wooden mounting braces. I got it on eBay, here's the item number for a similar mill (They're fairly generic and are re-sold by a number of importers): 262850371022. --What do you think? Would it work for 3D printing or is it too slow/limited? Given the prices for some of the nicer 3D printers it's not terribly expensive, so it seemed like a good possible match for mounting an extruder. I've tried mounting a laser for light-duty paper cutting and burning text/images into wood, which worked quite well (No visible stepping artifacts, even under magnification), though a bit slow (1000mm/min) since I wanted it to be accurate without a lot of slop.

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  20. take a look at mach 4 machining software, it's reasonable, powerful and compatible with most motion boards. tons of plugging and a support forum.

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  21. Laser Cutter next!

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  22. WhiteDieselShed9 March 2017 at 07:27

    Please stop the music... Its so annoying and i wander off to browse the other videos on
    offer instead of listening to your commentry and watching the full video.
    Shame because you have some great video's. No thumbs down but no thumbs up either.

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  23. Paul Frederick9 March 2017 at 07:27

    This quickly turned into a, "my grandpa's axe" story. Only replaced the head twice, and the handle three times!

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  24. You can't use wd-40 when drilling, it will heat up the bit and break.

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